ISO 50001 Energy Management System

Manage the risks surrounding
your future energy supply

Continually improving efficiency: in your energy use and your business

Effective energy management isn’t just good for business, it’s also becoming a requirement. And the best way to achieve it is with ISO 50001. The international standard outlines energy management practices that are considered to be the best, globally. Energy management experts from more than 60 countries developed the standard and now we can help you tap into that expertise, every day, to help you save energy, cut costs and meet environmental requirements

Are you ready for energy management?

Whether you’re new to ISO 50001 or looking to take your expertise further, we have the right resources and services. We offer packages that can be customized to your business to jump-start your energy management – cutting the cost of services you don’t need. A package of ISO 50001 products and services can be designed to remove the complexity of getting you where you want to be, whatever your starting point.

GETTING STARTED WITH ISO 50001 ENERGY MANAGEMENT

The energy management standard will give you the tools to improve energy efficiency and lower your energy bills. In fact, ISO 50001 could prove fundamental to the future of your business, but you can get started right now.

ISO 50001 LOWERS YOUR ENERGY CONSUMPTION, YOUR ENERGY BILLS AND YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT

Benefits of ISO 50001

Used by large and small organizations across the world to manage and reduce energy use and costs, ISO 50001 is an excellent framework to help implement an energy management system (EnMS). From large retailers to smaller manufacturers and small businesses, the standard offers organizations the opportunity to become more resilient against energy costs and availability. Whether you’re interested in certifying to ISO 50001 to reduce costs, comply with legislation or increase your sustainability, implementing the standard provides a systematic approach to achieving all three.

Effective energy management isn’t just good for business, it’s also becoming a requirement. ISO 50001 will help your organization understand how you’re using various types of energy and identify realistic ways of reducing consumption, emissions and costs. The international standard outlines energy management practices that not only save your organization money today, but also in the long term; all while helping shield your bottom line from the increasing cost of energy. ISO 50001 also shows your commitment to reducing environmental impact which can help you stand out from your competition and earn new business.

How ISO 50001 works and what it delivers for you and your company

ISO 50001 is a sustainable business tool that helps organizations implement a flexible and robust energy management system (EnMS). Effective energy management isn’t just good for business, it’s also becoming a requirement. ISO 50001 will help your organization understand how you’re using various types of energy and identify realistic ways of reducing consumption, emissions and costs. The international standard outlines energy management practices that not only save your organization money today, but also in the long term; all while helping shield your bottom line from the increasing cost of energy. ISO 50001 also shows your commitment to reducing environmental impact which can help you stand out from your competition and earn new business.

Released in 2011, and containing 4 key clauses, ISO 50001 is based on the management system model of continual improvement. The standard provides a framework of requirements for organizations to:

  • Develop a policy for more efficient use of energy
  • Fix targets and objectives to meet the policy
  • Use data to better understand and make decisions about energy use
  • Measure the results
  • Review how well the energy policy is working The Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycle is the operating principle of ISO management standards. By following this cycle, you can effectively manage—and continually improve—your organization’s effectiveness.

Some of the core concepts of ISO 50001 are:

Leadership

The standard requires significant involvement by your leadership team to make sure it’s effective. These changes will ensure compatibility between the energy management policy and the organization’s strategic direction. This alignment will improve the performance of the EnMS reducing consumption, waste and costs across the organization.

Risk Management

The volatile nature of energy supply suggests that a pointed focus on reducing consumption would, in turn, improve an organization’s resilience by reducing energy demands. At the organization level, energy is no longer just about reducing costs or environmental impact, it’s also about:

  • business continuity
  • resilience
  • achieving of overall strategic business objectives
  • ability to deliver stakeholder value.

Compliance

As various countries and/or municipalities begin to outline their plans for lowering emissions, ISO 50001 certification may be a means of meeting compliance regulations. Given the global nature of ISO standards, ISO 50001 certification is a logical option for governments and regulatory agencies to adopt as de facto compliance as they plan and implement their reduction strategies.

Plan, Do, Check, Act

The Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycle is the operating principle of ISO management standards. By following this cycle, you can effectively manage — and continually improve — your organization’s energy use.

Plan: Establish objectives and draft your plans

Do: Implement your plans

Check: Measure and monitor your actual results against your planned objectives

Act: Correct and improve your plans to meet or exceed your planned results


KEY REQUIREMENTS OF ISO 50001

 

Clause 1: Scope This clause relates to the scope or coverage of the standard to help organizations achieve the intended outcomes of its EnMS.

Clause 2: Normative references There are no normative references, for example other additional requirements in other standards, that have to be considered. The clause is retained in order to maintain the same numbering scheme as all the other management system standards.

Clause 3: Terms and definitions This listing of terms and definitions is included in the standard to provide readers with an understanding of terms related to energy management.

Clause 4.2: Management Responsibility This clause clearly lays out the need for top management to commit to supporting the energy management system. This means that high-level representatives of the organization have to support the definition, establishment, implementation and maintenance of an energy policy. Key commitments include conducting management reviews, making sure that the necessary human, technology and financial resources are available and ensuring that energy objectives and targets are established.

Clause 4.3: Energy Policy An organization’s energy policy will confirm its commitment to improving energy performance. The policy must reflect the size and nature of the business, commit to continual improvement and compliance with any legal requirements. It will also establish a process for setting and reviewing energy objectives and targets, support energy-efficient product purchases and how and when the policy is reviewed and updated.

Clause 4.4: Energy Planning This clause focuses on how a business organizes itself to address its energy use. It requires information gathering around the organization’s activities that can affect energy as well as what, if any, legal requirements the organization must meet. The organization must also develop an energy review that analyses energy use and consumption to gain an understanding of where in the business energy consumption is highest. Using this data, improvement opportunities must be identified and prioritized. How the improvements will be measured also has to be decided. Establishing an energy baseline is also required to understand how much energy is being used before the energy management system is put in place. Finally, in line with the energy policy, energy objectives and targets need to be established, implemented and documented along with action plans detailing how they will be achieved.

Clause 4.5: Implementation and Operation In order to make sure that the EnMS is successfully implemented and maintained, ISO 50001 states that all workers who are involved with the EnMS must be competent and properly trained according to their role. Your organization should carefully review the capabilities of the employees who will be working with the energy management system and determine if training or additional hiring is required. There must also be a system in place that supports the communication of information about the system to impacted workers as well a way for workers to provide feedback, concerns or suggestions. Documenting the EnMS is also very important. There must be a clear description of the system, its scope, boundaries, energy policy and objectives. The same must be done for all of the associated action plans, documents and records. To ensure that it continues to be relevant your organization will also have to develop a process for maintenance, regular review and updating of the documentation. The establishment and maintenance of operational procedures and controls, as required by the standard, helps organizations ensure they’re controlling significant energy use and adhering to the policies, objectives and targets established in the energy plan. The design requirement in the Implementation and Operation section of the standard requires that all new, modified or renovated facilities, equipment, systems and processes that an organization builds or implements that have a significant impact on energy use must undergo an energy performance evaluation and that the resulting findings be incorporated into the new project. It is also a requirement that when purchasing or procuring energy services or products that consume energy, organizations have criteria for measuring energy use, consumption and efficiency over the product/service’s lifetime and that potential suppliers are made aware that purchasing decisions will be partly determined by these criteria.

Clause 4.6: Checking This is all about measuring and evaluating your EnMS to ensure that it’s effective. You will need to consider what should be measured, how it will be measured and how and when the data will be analysed and reported on. Internal audits will need to be carried out so that you can make sure that the EnMS is in line with ISO 50001 and is meeting the established objectives and targets. You will then have to address any nonconformities by taking corrective and preventative actions.

Clause 4.7: Management Review According to a set schedule, the top management of your organization will have to review the EnMS. This is done so that it continues to be suitable, adequate and effective. Highlights include a review of the energy policy, the organization’s energy performance, legal compliance and any changes that have occurred to laws and regulations set by government, industry or other bodies, the status of corrective and preventative actions as well as recommendations for improvement. Typically, the results of the Management Review will include things like changes to the energy policy, energy performance indicators and/or the EnMS’s objectives and targets.